Jul
29
2011

Femme Fatale in Launceston this winter

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With the highly-anticipated Underbelly: Razor set to explore the lives of some of Australia’s most notorious female criminals when it premieres next month, you may feel inspired to learn more about the country’s most notorious female offenders during your next visit to Tasmania.

The fascinating Femme Fatale: The Female Criminal exhibition is currently on show at the Inveresk Precinct in Launceston offers intriguing insight into some of the country’s most infamous historic figures.

While female criminals are often portrayed as seductive, vicious vixens, the depiction of their time behind bars tells a different story.

This exhibition, which is presented by the Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales, explores both extremes when it comes to women and crime – their glamorous portrayal in pulp novels and popular culture, as well as the stark reality of their true stories.

Inveresk has been developed on a former heritage industrial site and also features a number of other insights into what life may have been like in the area a century ago. It is an excellent destination for anyone looking to learn more about Australian and Tasmanian art and history, including Launceston’s old rail yard and blacksmith shops.

As you make your way through the Femme Fatale exhibit, you’ll be able to learn more about some of Australia’s most notorious female offenders, including poisoner Yvonne Fletcher, Eugenia Leigh – known as the ‘man woman murderer’ – and sly grogger Kate Leigh, who is the subject of the newest Underbelly series.

Underbelly: Razor stars Danielle McCormack as Leigh and Chelsie Preston Crayford as her nemesis, vice queen Tilly Devine and is set to run for 13 episodes.

Jo Horsburgh, head of drama at Nine, remarked that the “ambitious” drama will transport viewers back in time.

“It is a fascinating glimpse into back alleys, bedrooms and grog shops, where the good, the bad and downright naughty battle it out for supremacy in a post-World War I Australia.

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